International Carnivorous Plant Society

Carnivorous Plant Newsletter Archive

 

Many triggerplants (Stylidium spp.; Stylidiaceae) form arbuscular mycorrhizal associations

Stephen P. Moberly and Maxine Watson and Douglas W. Darnowski

Carniv. Pl. Newslett. 46(1):23-27
Published March 2017

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Abstract

Triggerplants (Stylidium spp.; Stylidiaceae) grow in Australia and a few areas to its north, though >95% of the >300 species in the genus Stylidium are endemic to Australia (Darnowski 2002). Their name comes from the extremely rapid, active, and resettable pollination mechanism which they use. In addition, they have been recently recognized as possessing at least some of the traits of carnivorous plants, specifically the ability to trap and digest prey insects (Darnowski et al. 2006), as well as the more recently-demonstrated ability to transport and, therefore, benefit, from nutrients obtained in that way (Darnowski 2017). Generally, they trap prey which are much smaller than their pollinators. Triggerplants typically are found in extremely nutrient poor conditions where genera such as Drosera and Utricularia are usually found in the same places.

Keywords: triggerplant, Stylidium, AM-fungi, mycorrhizae, carnivorous

Article Citation

Stephen P. Moberly and Maxine Watson and Douglas W. Darnowski. 2017. Many triggerplants (Stylidium spp.; Stylidiaceae) form arbuscular mycorrhizal associations. Carniv. Pl. Newslett. 46(1):23-27.

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