International Carnivorous Plant Society

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Unexpected discovery of 7-Methyljuglone (Ramentaceone) in several Australian sundews

Jan Schlauer and Siegfried R. H. Hartmeyer and Irmgard Hartmeyer

Carniv. Pl. Newslett. 46(1):20-22
Published March 2017

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Abstract

Naphthoquinones are characteristic constituents that have been detected in numerous plant families. There are at least four fundamentally different biosynthetic routes that lead to the naphthoquinone skeleton (Durand & Zenk 1974). Some naphthoquinones are formed via the acetatepolymalonate (= polyketide) pathway, and plant families notoriously known for containing such acetogenins are Iridaceae, Ebenaceae, Plumbaginaceae, Droseraceae, Nepenthaceae, Drosophyllaceae, Dioncophyllaceae, and Ancistrocladaceae. While all these families include species that form plumbagin (= 2-methyljuglone, Fig. 1), its regioisomer 7-methyljuglone (= ramentaceone, Fig. 1) has so far only been detected in Ebenaceae, Nepenthaceae, and Droseraceae (Schlauer et al. 2005).

Keywords: Metabolism, phytochemistry, naphthoquinones, Drosera, chemotaxonomy

Article Citation

Jan Schlauer and Siegfried R. H. Hartmeyer and Irmgard Hartmeyer. 2017. Unexpected discovery of 7-Methyljuglone (Ramentaceone) in several Australian sundews. Carniv. Pl. Newslett. 46(1):20-22.

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